Treat Em’ Right: October Is National Dental Hygiene Month | Manhattan Beach Dentist

Tooth decay is one of the most common dental problems that dentists see among patients. Tooth decay typically occurs when foods containing carbohydrates are left on your teeth. The good news is that tooth decay is preventable. Practicing proper oral hygiene and visiting your dentist for regular checkups can help aid in preventing tooth decay. In honor of National Dental Hygiene Month, here are a few steps you can take to protect both your teeth and gums:

Brush your teeth daily. It’s important to brush your teeth two times a day, for two minutes each session. This accompanied with flossing can go a long way in preventing tooth decay, cavities and gum disease.

Snack on healthy foods. It’s best to avoid eating sweets that may potentially alter your blood sugar and damage your health. Try eating more healthy snacks that contain healthy proteins and fats that will aid in a healthy body, this in turn can prevent tooth decay.

Ask about dental sealants. This is a method that is performed by dentists. Dental sealants are a plastic coating that’s applied to the back molars to protect them from tooth decay.

Rinse with fluoride. Rinse your mouth out daily with mouthwash that contains fluoride. Some mouthwashes even have antiseptic ingredients that can help kill bacteria that causes plaque.

Visit your dentist regularly. Visiting your dentist for routine checkups and professional teeth cleanings will help prevent tooth decay immensely. Professional cleanings are performed by dentists to remove plaque build-up that can lead to tooth decay.

If you have questions or concerns regarding dental hygiene, contact Dr. Anthony Yamada DDS at 310-546-2595 to schedule a consultation today. Or visit www.anthonyyamadadds.com for additional information.

Proudly serving Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, El Segundo, Redondo Beach, Torrance and all surrounding areas.

When Your Dentist Can’t Save Your Tooth | Manhattan Beach Dentist

ThinkstockPhotos-185147513The goal of most dental procedures is to save teeth. Brushing, flossing, and cleaning helps prevent decay. Procedures like filling cavities are meant to remove decay without damaging the tooth. Root canals are used to remove infected nerves within a tooth, but spare the tooth itself. Dental crowns are a method to strengthen the tooth even after significant parts of the tooth have been removed. Despite these advanced procedures designed to save teeth, some teeth simply cannot be saved. When teeth must be removed, your dentist will recommend a tooth extraction.

The most common reason that an extraction may be necessary is if the tooth is broken, or if the tooth is severely damaged by tooth decay. In some cases, severe periodontal disease may cause the supporting tissue to be unable to sustain the tooth, and may necessitate tooth removal as well. Extra teeth – such as wisdom teeth – may need to be removed to prevent crowding.

When extraction is necessary, there are two typical methods: simple extraction and surgical extraction. Simple extraction is typically used on teeth that are visible and properly aligned – dental forceps are used to grasp and rock the tooth back and forth until it can be pulled from its socket. Surgical extraction is often required for teeth that are not visible, or are not properly aligned. In surgical extraction, a dentist or oral surgeon will make an incision to reach the tooth, and may need to break the tooth into pieces in order to remove it from the mouth.

If you have questions or concerns regarding tooth extractions, contact Dr. Anthony Yamada DDS at 310-546-2595 to schedule a consultation today. Or visit www.anthonyyamadadds.com for additional information.

Proudly serving Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, El Segundo, Redondo Beach, Torrance and all surrounding areas.

Swish, Swish: Ways Mouthwash Is Good for You | Manhattan Beach Dentist

skd284147sdcWe know having a good dental hygiene routine is important to keeping our mouths healthy. The better we treat it, the better our dental check-ups become. Brush, floss, rinse – it’s all very basic. But do you know why mouthwash is so beneficial to our dental health?

Mouthwash can cut back the level of bacteria in your mouth. Research shows that adding mouthwash to your oral care routine can in fact improve the overall cleanliness of your mouth and help keep gum inflammation at bay. But gargling and rinsing for a few seconds doesn’t quite cut it.  Most mouthwashes are at their most effective when in contact with your mouth tissues for 30 seconds per use.

Freshens breath. First and most obviously, mouthwash temporarily reduces bad breath. Mouthwash kills bacteria associated with causing bad breath leaving you with minty fresh breath. Who doesn’t love minty fresh breath?

Prevents plaque build-up. Various mouthwashes help prevent plaque build-up on your gums, in-between teeth, and on the surface of your teeth, but it cannot reduce the plaque that already exists on your teeth.

Removes particles. This may seem out of order, but if you rinse BEFORE brushing, you can rinse out loose particles in your mouth to make brushing and flossing more effective.

Stop cavities. Regular use of mouthwash before and after you brush and floss, you can reduce the chances of cavities forming. Mouthwashes that contain fluoride can prevent cavities and strengthen your enamel. Check the label.

If you have questions or concerns regarding mouthwash, contact Dr. Anthony Yamada DDS at 310-546-2595 to schedule a consultation today. Or visit www.anthonyyamadadds.com for additional information.

Proudly serving Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, El Segundo, Redondo Beach, Torrance and all surrounding areas.

Are You Brushing Correctly? | Manhattan Beach Dentist

oral hygieneMost people have heard that poor dental care is linked to other health maladies, according to the American Dental Association (ADA). And while you may brush regularly, you’re probably making one of these 6 mistakes.

Wrong time of day. Saliva production slows down when you snooze, spurring the bacteria in your mouth to multiply even faster. Brush twice a day (morning and bedtime) for at least 2 minutes, spending 30 seconds on each quadrant.

Wrong brush. Pick a soft bristle toothbrush that can dislodge any plaque stuck in crevices. Brushing with a medium or hard model — and using excessive pressure — may make sense but it can cause your gums to recede and expose the surface of teeth roots.

Wrong technique. Straight strokes won’t get the job done. Position the handle of your brush so the bristles point at a 30- to 45-degree angle. Rotate your wrist in a circular motion to effectively remove the plaque.

You miss spots. Food or debris can easily get stuck in the crevices between the carpet-like strands, known as papillae, on the surface of your tongue. Run that toothbrush over your tongue as well!

You don’t rinse. Spitting out your toothpaste doesn’t totally remove all the harmful stuff that you loosened while brushing. Adding an oral rinse to your routine is greatly beneficial to your oral health.

You don’t replace your brush. The ADA recommends buying a new brush every 3 or 4 months. Worn bristles won’t effectively remove plaque or bacteria.  If you’ve been sick, swap out your brush immediately.

If you have questions or concerns regarding proper dental care, contact Dr. Anthony Yamada DDS at 310-546-2595 to schedule a consultation today. Or visit www.anthonyyamadadds.com for additional information.

Proudly serving Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, El Segundo, Redondo Beach, Torrance and all surrounding areas.

How to Prevent Tooth Decay | Manhattan Beach, CA

oral hygiene

Tooth decay is one of the most common dental problems that dentists see among patients. This is the destruction of your tooth structure; tooth decay can affect both your tooth enamel and dentine. Tooth decay typically occurs when foods containing carbohydrates, such as bread, cereals, milk or candy, are left on your teeth.

The good news is that tooth decay is preventable. Practicing proper oral hygiene and visiting your dentist for regular checkups can help aid in preventing tooth decay. There also a few other steps you can take to protect both your teeth and gums, which include the following:

  • Brush your teeth daily. It’s important to brush your teeth two times a day, for two minutes each session. This accompanied with flossing can go a long way in preventing tooth decay, cavities and gum disease.
  • Snack on healthy foods. It’s best to avoid eating sweets that may potentially alter your blood sugar and damage your health. Try eating more healthy snacks that contain healthy proteins and fats that will aid in a healthy body, this in turn can prevent tooth decay.
  • Ask about dental sealants. This is a method that is performed by dentists. Dental sealants are a plastic coating that’s applied to the back molars to protect them from tooth decay.
  • Rinse with fluoride. Rinse your mouth out daily with mouthwash that contains fluoride. Some mouthwashes even have antiseptic ingredients that can help kill bacteria that causes plaque.
  • Visit your dentist regularly. Visiting your dentist for routine checkups and professional teeth cleanings will help prevent tooth decay immensely. Professional cleanings are performed by dentists to remove plaque build-up that can lead to tooth decay.

As you can see, there are several simple ways that you can prevent tooth decay. One study even found that chewing gum that contains xylitol can temporarily slow the growth of the bacteria that causes tooth decay.

If you suspect that you may be suffering from tooth decay, contact Dr. Anthony Yamada, DDS at 310-546-2595 to schedule an appointment today. For additional information regarding tooth decay or oral health please visit www.anthonyyamadadds.com.

Proudly serving Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, El Segundo, Redondo Beach and Torrance.

The Effect of Snoring on Oral Health

snoring on oral health

Let’s face it. Everyone knows what snoring is and almost everyone knows how annoying it can be. But, most people just dismiss it as a normal part of sleeping because almost everyone snores. But, as it turns out, snoring is quite harmful and more importantly, it has something to do with your teeth and oral health in general.

What Causes Snoring

The severity of snoring usually varies from person to person. It can go from being a mild nuisance and disturbance to a symptom of something more serious, such as a progressive disorder known as “sleep apnea”. Also, those with a long history of snoring may develop serious sleep disorder symptoms in time, such as excessive daytime sleepiness, memory loss, headaches in the morning, loss of sexual drive and poor performance at work or school.

There are many factors that cause snoring, such as:

  • The use of alcohol, sedatives and even tobacco. Any one of these products can force your throat muscles to relax more than usual and promote the obstruction of the airways, which causes snoring.
  • Nasal problems. Those with chronic nasal congestion may interfere with their air flow every time they breathe and cause snoring.
  • Anatomical conditions. Some people with elongated uvulas or low, thick soft palates, large tonsils or adenoids naturally have narrower airways and this can cause snoring. Also, those who are overweight and obese tend to have narrower airways as well, but this is because of the excess fat on the back of their throats. In both cases, the narrow airways affect the air flow when breathing, which then leads to snoring.

Pregnant women, those who have a long family history of snoring, those who are aged 40 and above, as well as males are more likely to develop snoring problems as well.

Oral Health and Your Teeth

Our teeth need saliva for protection and because snoring causes your mouth to dry out (xerostomia), it can lead to a variety of oral health problems. This includes bad breath (halitosis), burning mouth syndrome, mouth sores, infections, tooth decay and in worse cases, gum disease.

If you are, what’s often described as a “loud snorer”, it is imperative that you follow a strict oral hygiene routine to reduce the chances of you developing any one of the oral health problems stated above.

It also seems that oral appliance therapy, a common treatment of snoring, can lead to negative dental side effects. Included of which are dental discomfort, excess salivation, TMJ, facial muscle pain and even bite changes.

Still, you shouldn’t be discouraged about getting oral appliance therapy because they are rather effective in the treatment of snoring and the side effects are often reversible.

To put simply, snoring has a huge effect on our teeth, both directly and indirectly. If you feel that you and your family are already suffering too much because of your snoring, consult a dentist. They can present to you a number of medical treatment options to help you deal you’re your snoring problem.

Make an appointment today with Anthony R. Yamada DDS at 310-546-2595 or online at www.anthonyyamadadds.com.

 

 

Saltwater Rinse Benefits |Manhattan Beach Dentist

177406608It may not be the best taste but a warm saltwater rinse can be highly beneficial to your oral health. Everyone from your mother to your dentist ha recommended them. There are many benefits to the method. The inherent preserving and antibacterial properties in salt when applied to foods is well known, but it has tremendous effects on microbes, too, when diluted and dissolved in water. The reason why salt water is effective as a mouth rinse is because it is more than just a disinfectant; it also helps in removing swelling of oral tissues.

Conditions That Benefit From Salt Water Mouth Rinse

  • Halitosis: Halitosis is the medical term for bad breath. It is an uncomfortable condition that happens to people for some underlying reasons. While poor oral hygiene is a cause, despite washing your mouth for several times you may still fail to beat halitosis. Rinsing your mouth with salt water can prevent bacterial growth and infection, which often causes halitosis.
  • Gingivitis: Gingivitis is a typical condition characterized by swelling, inflammation and bleeding gums caused due to growth of bacteria that coats teeth naturally. Bacteria proliferation forms a sticky and whitish film, called plaque. Rinsing the mouth with salt water solution daily can help in soothing inflamed gums and wipes out bacteria.
  • Toothache: Toothache can happen to anyone; it is a common complication caused by several reasons. While bacteria is one of the main cause, sometimes, weak roots or open nerve endings can also lead to sensitivity and throbbing in teeth. Gargling regularly with salt water can offer some relief.
  • Sore Throat: Sore throat causing cough and pain is common and a seasonal condition. Salt water gargle can help in relieving soreness(Source: webmd.com).

Salt water has been used by multiple cultures over countless generations to clean wounds and rinse out mouths. Salt has antibacterial and preserving properties when applied in abundance to foods, but its affect on microbes when dissolved and diluted in water is less clear. Salt water changes the pH of the mouth, which deters the reproduction of many microorganisms, but it doesn’t outright kill many forms. At the very least, salt water is soothing to the mucous membranes of your mouth, but it should not be swallowed in quantity. Talk to your dentist about the benefits of washing your mouth with salt water.

To make a saltwater solution for rinsing the mouth: Mix 1 tsp of salt to 1 cup of warm water.

Some of the old tried and true remedies are still around for good reason. Give it a try!

For more information about oral health call Dr. Anthony Yamada in Manhattan Beach, CA at 310-567-2595 or visit www.anthonyyamadadds.com.

Dr. Anthony Yamada also proudly accepts patients from Manhattan Beach, Ranchos Palos Verdes, Los Angeles, Redondo Beach, Palos Verdes Estates, Torrance, Playa Del Rey, and surrounding areas.

Xylitol & Preventing Tooth Decay | Manhattan Beach Dentist

479328903Many patients like to take the extra steps to maintain good oral health and hygiene. Have you ever seen advertisements for sugar free gum that claim to help your teeth and wondered whether or not it actually works? It turns out, many of those products actually do work, and one of the reasons why is a common sugar replacement called Xylitol. Xylitol is a sugar alcohol, a natural, sweet substance often used to sweeten foods without the caloric impact of sugar. While Xylitol is sweet, it doesn’t have the same impact on your body as sugar. Xylitol is a naturally occurring alcohol found in most plant material, including many fruits and vegetables. It is extracted from birch wood to make medicine.

First, Xylitol starves the bacteria in your mouth of food. Where the normal bacteria on your mouth responsible for cavities (streptococcus mutans) feeds on sugar, it can not feed on Xylitol – chewing sugar free gum containing Xylitol not only doesn’t feed this damaging bacteria, but it allows your body to wash away the sugar. Over time, fewer and fewer bacteria will live in the mouth, and less plaque will form.

The most common sources of Xylitol in sufficient quantities for dental impact is in gum and mint products. While replacing sugar with any Xylitol will help avoid feeding the streptococcus mutans bacteria, if Xylitol is listed as the first ingredient, it likely has enough to actually decrease decay-causing bacteria over time if chewed regularly, perhaps 3-5 times per day for 5 minutes at a time.

Xylitol has been approved as safe by the US FDA and World Health Organization, but like most things in life, should be taken in moderation. While common in foods such as gum and mints, it’s also available over the internet directly – care should be taken, as too much Xylitol can be difficult for your body to digest, and can have  fiber-like laxative properties.  While chewing gum a few times per day may take effort, it’s a great, cheap, simple way to keep your teeth clean, and help fight off cavities.

Research has shown that the use of xylitol also helps repair damage to the enamel. Saliva in itself protects the mouth and teeth. Stimulated saliva in particular contains all the components needed to repair early cavities. The dental benefits of xylitol can have a significant influence on your oral health.

For more information about oral health call Dr. Anthony Yamada in Manhattan Beach, CA at 310-567-2595 or visit www.anthonyyamadadds.com.

Dr. Anthony Yamada also proudly accepts patients from Manhattan Beach, Ranchos Palos Verdes, Los Angeles, Redondo Beach, Palos Verdes Estates, Torrance, Playa Del Rey, and surrounding areas.

Best & Worst Types of Halloween Candy | Manhattan Beach Dentist

77739226Halloween is a holiday most everyone enjoys, except for your dentist! Halloween is just around the corner, and candy consumption is inevitable! We all know candy is one of those ‘no-no’ things that are terrible for your teeth. Of course everything in moderation is fine. Brushing your teeth after consuming candy is highly beneficial, but not immediately after as your enamel is still soft. But as far as Halloween goes, are there better choices out there? Yes! Below is your best and worst choices for Halloween candy.

Worst:

  •  Chewy/sticky sweets, such as gummy candies, taffy, and even dried fruit can be difficult for children and adults to resist, and even more difficult to remove from teeth. “These candies are a serious source of tooth decay, particularly when they get stuck in the crevices between teeth, making it nearly impossible for saliva to wash them away,” Dr. Sherwood says.
  •  Sour candies are highly acidic and can break down tooth enamel quickly. The good news: Saliva slowly helps to restore the natural balance of the acid in the mouth. Dr. Sherwood recommends that patients wait 30 minutes to brush their teeth after consuming sour/acidic candies; otherwise, they will be brushing the acid onto more tooth surfaces and increasing the risk of enamel erosion.
  • Sugary snacks, including candy corn, cookies, and cake, all contain high amounts of sugar, which can cause tooth decay.

Best:

  •  Sugar-free lollipops and hard candies stimulate saliva, which can help prevent dry mouth. “A dry mouth allows plaque to build up on teeth faster, leading to an increased risk of cavities,” Dr.Sherwood says.
  • Sugar-free gum can actually prevent cavities as it not only dislodges food particles from between the teeth but also increases saliva—which works to neutralize the acids of the mouth and prevent tooth decay.
  • Dark chocolate and its antioxidants, according to some studies, can be good for the heart and may even lower blood pressure(Source: knowyourteeth.com).

Enjoy the holiday and candy but be accountable to your teeth, or we’ll be pulling out the drill at your next visit!

For more information about broken teeth and oral health call Dr. Anthony Yamada in Manhattan Beach, CA at 310-567-2595 or visit www.anthonyyamadadds.com.

Dr. Anthony Yamada also proudly accepts patients from Manhattan Beach, Ranchos Palos Verdes, Los Angeles, Redondo Beach, Palos Verdes Estates, Torrance, Playa Del Rey, and surrounding areas.