Coffee, Tea and Your Teeth | Manhattan Beach Dentist

For some, it’s a daily ritual – for others, it’s a warm relief on a chilly day. And now that we are beginning to get a taste of Autumn, it’s time to discuss the warm tasty beverages known as coffee and tea. On the average, Americans drink 400 million cups of coffee a year, and 300 servings of tea a year. And while it varies on the person, that is a lot of teeth staining! Because no matter how diligent we are with our dental hygiene, over time coffee and tea will begin to stain your teeth.

Within various plants contain tannins and these tannins are what will begin to tinge your teeth after time. The darker the tea or coffee, the quicker it will start to darken your teeth’s enamel. So, if you are worried about teeth stains, try to stay away from black tea and dark coffees. Just adding a bit of milk or drinking through a straw are quick easy ways to stave off the stains, but there is no need to worry – there are plenty of ways that staining can be remedied.

If you don’t have an excessive stain problem, just using a tooth whitening toothpaste can work wonders on subtle staining. It’s something you can use daily to help keep your tooth enamel bright. If you have a more noticeable problem, you may want to invest in an over-the-counter option, like whitening strips or trays. These are all great ways to keep your teeth as white as possible until you can get a professional cleaning/whitening treatment the next time you are in the dentist’s chair.

If you have questions or concerns regarding teeth whitening, contact Dr. Anthony Yamada, DDS at 310-546-2595 to schedule a consultation today, or visit www.anthonyyamadadds.com for additional information.

Proudly serving Manhattan Beach and all surrounding areas.

Before You Drink that Cup of Coffee | Manhattan Beach Dentist

young beautiful woman drink coffee

There is a reason there is a Starbucks on every corner. People rely on it as the pick-me-up of choice to get them through the day. So much so, coffee statistics show that an average amount of 3.1 cups of coffees is consumed by an individual every day in the United States. 50 percent of the population, which equals out to about 150 million Americans drink espresso, cappuccino, latte, or iced/ cold coffees. With coffee being such a prominent figure in our daily lives, it’s stressful to learn that coffee is actually incredibly bad for your teeth. How can this tasty jolt of energy do so much damage? The reason being that coffee contains enough acids to permanently damage teeth. Here are a couple other reasons as to why coffee is bad for your teeth:

  • Acids in coffee directly attack your tooth enamel. This leaves teeth vulnerable to cavities, as well as cracked and broken teeth.
  • Acids and bad bacteria feed off each other. Bacteria left in your mouth love to feed off the acids found in coffee. They multiply rapidly and become responsible for cavities, gum disease, and bad breath.
  • Coffee stains teeth. While this is no surprise, coffee is the leading contributor to stained or yellow teeth.

It isn’t necessary to completely give up on coffee. But it is necessary to keep it in moderation. And order a cup of water alongside that cup o’ joe. Rinsing your mouth will help prevent staining between dental cleanings.

If you have questions or concerns regarding the effects of coffee on your teeth, contact Dr. Anthony Yamada DDS at 310-546-2595 to schedule a consultation today. Or visit www.anthonyyamadadds.com for additional information.

Proudly serving Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, El Segundo, Redondo Beach, Torrance and all surrounding areas.